Thursday, December 30, 2010

Margaret George Novel Elizabeth I


Margaret George's upcoming novel entitled, 'Elizabeth I' will be released on both continents on the same day: April 5/ 5, April, 2011!! SOUND THE TRUMPETS

The publication information is the same via Amazon.com & Amazon.co.uk:
Hardcover: 688 pages
Publisher: Viking Adult (April 5, 2011)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0670022535
ISBN-13: 978-0670022533


Description
New York Times best-selling Margaret George captures history’s most enthralling queen—as she confronts rivals to her throne and to her heart.
One of today’s premier historical novelists, Margaret George dazzles here as she tackles her most difficult subject yet: the legendary Elizabeth Tudor, queen of enigma—the Virgin Queen who had many suitors, the victor of the Armada who hated war; the gorgeously attired, jewel-bedecked woman who pinched pennies. England’s greatest monarch has baffled and intrigued the world for centuries. But what was she really like?
In this novel, her flame-haired, look-alike cousin, Lettice Knollys, thinks she knows all too well. Elizabeth’s rival for the love of Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester, and mother to the Earl of Essex, the mercurial nobleman who challenged Elizabeth’s throne, Lettice has been intertwined with Elizabeth since childhood. This is a story of two women of fierce intellect and desire, one trying to protect her country, and throne, the other trying to regain power and position for her family. Their rivalry, and its ensuing drama, soon involves everyone close to Elizabeth, from the famed courtiers who enriched the crown to the legendary poets and playwrights who paid homage to it with their works. Intimate portraits of the personalities who made the Elizabethan age great—Shakespeare, Marlowe, Dudley, Raleigh, Drake—fill these pages, giving us an unforgettable glimpse of a queen who ruled as much from the heart as from the head, and considered herself married to her people.
This magnificent, stay-up-all-night page-turner is George’s finest and one that is sure to delight readers of Alison Weir, Philippa Gregory, and Hilary Mantel.

Reviews/Praise
“This is Margaret George’s best book yet and a true masterpiece. Her Elizabeth in autumn is unforgettable.”
Sharon Kay Penman

“This is one of the best historical novels I have read in ages, a stunning tour de force. It conveys a vivid and authentic sense of Elizabeth Tudor and her world. Extensively researched with the highest integrity, and deeply engaging, it sets a new benchmark for the genre. I cannot recommend it highly enough.” – Alison Weir


Excerpt

1

The Vatican, March 1588


Felice Peretti, otherwise known as Pope Sixtus V, stood swaying before the stack of rolled Bulls.

They were neatly arranged like a cord of wood, alternating short and long sides, their lead seals hanging down like a row of puppy tails.

“Ah,” he said, eyeing them with great satisfaction. They seemed to radiate power. But one thing was lacking: his blessing.

Raising his right hand, he spoke in sonorous Latin: “O sovereign God, hear the prayer of your servant Sixtus. Acting in accordance with my office as the vicar of Christ, his representative on earth, who has the power to bind and loose, to forgive sins or withhold forgiveness, I have pronounced judgment on that wicked woman of England, the pretender queen. She is hereby excommunicated from the body of Christendom until such time as she repents. In order that those living under her rule do not go down into damnation with her, we bless the Enterprise of England. Aboard the ships of the great Armada will go these Bulls of excommunication and sentence upon Elizabeth, the pretender queen of England, calling for her deposition, in order that her subjects may be rescued from her impiety and perverse government. They will see the happy light of day when Christ’s avengers set boots upon English soil. There they will be distributed to the faithful. Merciful God, we ask this in the savior’s name, and for his Holy Church.”

The sixty-eight-year-old pope then slowly circled the pile, making the sign of the cross and sprinkling it with holy water. Then he nodded to the Spanish envoy standing quietly to one side.

“You may transport them now,” he said. “The Armada leaves from Lisbon, does it not?”

“Yes, Your Holiness. Next month.”

Sixtus nodded. “They should arrive in plenty of time, then. You have waterproof canisters for them?”

“I am sure they will be provided. King Philip thinks of everything.”


A few observations and or questions struck me upon reading that brief excerpt of chapter 1.
For instance, anyone who has studied the life of Elizabeth I or even watched various films and television shows should recognize the signifigance of the year 1588 as well as mention of the Spanish Armada. Author, Margaret George, has chosen to begin in a very dramatic and emotional way. Writers Take Note!

Also, the mention of The Vatican and Pope Sixtus V, the use of religious factors, makes me wonder what the connection will be later on. I can hypothesize but I'll just wait until April to find out for myself!

Oh, and the mention of "waterproof canisters" made me chuckle and ask out loud to myself, "really, I had no idea they actually used such a thing"...you learn something new every time!!

I must briefly touch upon how I discovered Margaret Georges' wonderful historical novels.
It was back in 1992 with her publication of 'Mary Queen Of Scotland And The Isles' an historical novel centered around the life of Mary Queen Of Scots.
I devoured that novel, reading it from cover to cover, underlining entire sections, highlighting pages, taking copious notes in many notebooks, running to the library at college to research places in Scotland, various historical figures, castles, etc.
It wouldn't be until the summer of 1997, upon college graduation, when my grandfather and I travelled to the UK including a stop in Edinburgh with a tour of Holyrood Palace.
All I could think about was the chapter from Margaret George's novel with her fabulous description of Mary Queen of Scots bedroom on one of the upper floors with the connecting chamber door. I couldn't wait to see if the door still existed and of course to see the four poster bed...alas the door was sealed up and there was just a wall but the bed and Holyrood Palace was unforgettable!


Thank you for stopping by and I hope everyone has a very HAPPY NEW YEAR! MAY 2011 be filled with joy peace and love for all!

1 comment:

Anonymous said...

nice

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